About your Search

20121201
20121231
SHOW
Book TV 19
Q & A 6
Today 6
( more )
STATION
CNNW 37
CSPAN2 33
CSPAN 28
MSNBCW 23
KGO (ABC) 18
KQED (PBS) 9
CNBC 8
WMAR (ABC) 8
KPIX (CBS) 7
WBAL (NBC) 7
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 6
WRC (NBC) 6
KRCB (PBS) 5
KTVU (FOX) 5
WJLA (ABC) 5
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 273
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 273 (some duplicates have been removed)
at the north pole. and, also tonight, america in search of something that is missing. what has happened to all the snow? >>> new hope. a change in the use of a breast cancer drug could make a big difference for some of the thousands of people fighting the disease. >>> made in america. we take you to the mall of america, and a brand new store you, the viewers, helped build. >> are we the first customers? >>> and, who is this? do you believe she's the queen of england? >> kate, my darling, are you there? >> the prank call rocking the royal family as other powerful people around the globe are getting punked. >>> good evening. we begin with another big bulletin about the record-breaking heat and the melting at the north pole. a new study shows a global thaw under way, affecting everyone on the planet. and it comes today as we learn how little snow there is here in the united states. as the temperatures here keep rising and the records keep falling. abc abc's meteorologist ginger zee tells us what's going on. >> reporter: nearly snowless in december. right now, only 7% of the united states is cover
states of america isn't a bad word. and when you hear your glass breaking at 3:00 a.m. and you call 911, you won't be able to pray hard enough for a gun in the hands of a good guy to get there fast enough to protect you. so why is the idea of a gun good when it's used to protect the president of our country or our police but bad when it's used to protect our children in our schools? >> to be clear, this wasn't a press conference. it was a statement. no questions were taken. that doesn't mean there weren't any interruptions. >> stop killing our children. it's the nra and assault weapons that are killing our children. >> protesters accused the nra of having blood on its hands. i'll be speaking to one of those in a moment. wayne lapierre paused and then continued and blamed the violence on video games, on the media, on just about everything but guns. they said the news media is consumed with hate for the nra, but the proposal to have armed guards in schools in america is stirring the most debate. jeffrey, let me lay my cards on the table off the top here. i watched that press conference or
for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is bbc world news america. reporting from washington, i'm kathy kaye. the white house says it will push from -- for tighter gun control days after the school shooting shattered new town. they tried to help children and five women are shot dead in pakistan simply for distributing polio vaccines. jansing into the future decades ne o one electronic superhighway long before many even knew he was being built. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. four days after the mass shootings in newtown, conn., the funerals continue for the 22 becomes lost their lives. and while the town mourns, the white house issued its strongest indication yet it will be pushing for tighter gun controls, including reinstating the assault weapons ban. from newtown, we begin our coverage. >> she loved or go wales and horses. a beautiful girl, her parents said. 6-year-old jessica was buried. another victim in america. that terrible friday as parents waited to
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is bbc world news america. reporting from washington, i'm kathy kaye. the white house says it will push from -- for tighter gun control days after the school shooting shattered new town. they tried to help children and five women are shot dead in pakistan simply for distributing polio vaccines. jansing into the future decades ago, one electronic superhighway long before many even knew he was being built. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. four days after the mass shootings in newtown, conn., the funerals continue for the 22 beco
>>> good evening. tonight, guns in america, the number one issue in america a week after the mass shooting in sandy hook. the nra breaks its silence. president obama and communities all over america paused in a moment of silence. president obama is calling for a ban on assault weapons. today, the nra offered a rather different solution. publicly breaking the silence. the silence for the first time since the massacre, the nra proposed a sweeping plan to have armed guards at every school in the nation. >> the truth is our society is populated by an unknown number of genuine monsters. people that are so deranged, so evil, so possessed by voices and driven by demons that no sane person can ever possibly comprehend them. they walk among us every single day. and does anybody really believe that the next adam lanza isn't planning his attack on a school? since when did a gun automatically become a bad word? a gun in the hands of a secret service agent protecting our president isn't a bad word. a gun in the hands of a soldier protecting the united states of america isn't a bad word. and wh
guns in america, a live special. >> if we work harder to keep guns out of the hands of dangerous people, there would be fewer atrocities in places like newtown. since friday morning an officer was gunned down, leaving four children without their mother. >> two officers were killed outside a grocery store outside topeka. >> a woman was shot and killed inside a las vegas casino. three people were shot inside an alabama hospital. a 4-year-old of the caught in a drive-by in missouri. taken off life support just yesterday. >> my 4-year-old baby. >> at least 10,000 americans murdered with guns every year. president obama said it is time for real reform right now. i talked to victims and family members, gun owners, also new york mayor and christiane amanpour and deepak chopra. they're all here. enough is nuenough. we want to hear from you too. >> good evening, this is our version of a town hall. a big conversation about guns in america. people on both sides of what very well may be the most important issue in this country. take a look at these people. they have all been touched in gun v
in america and elsewhere around the globe. four days after the mass shootings in newtown, conn., the funerals continue for the 22 becomes lost their lives. and while the town mourns, the white house issued its strongest indication yet it will be pushing for tighter gun controls, including reinstating the assault weapons ban. from newtown, we begin our coverage. >> she loved or go wales and horses. a beautiful girl, her parents said. 6-year-old jessica was buried. another victim in america. that terrible friday as parents waited to hear what happened in the school, their pastor was with them. >> one parent, one mother in desperation cried out "are there any survivors?" there was violence. there were officials looking at one another and then they said, no, there are no survivors. i do not know that i will ever forget the noise as people wept, wales, eelam -- wailed, yelled. it was horrible noise. suddenly, reality hit. there are no survivors. >> this horror has changed the mood in america, for now at least. there of been those who have demonstrated against guns, but not a manufacturer of the we
from now 10:00 p.m. eastern. piers morgan starts right now. >> tonight the top five things that america is talking about. number one, peace love and mutual understanding. >> we can't negotiate with ourselves. >> it is me. >> bob costas, did he cross the line. >> and the most outrageous royal prank over. >> hello there. could i please speak to kate please, my granddaughter? >> this is piers more dpgan ton. good evening. our big story tonight from what every one is talking about. the royal prank called heard around the world. and this shocking new york subway photograph. reports of chemical weapons in syria. let's get started with what promises to be a lively discussion. and a host of huff posts live. and welcome to you all. let's start with guns and the fall out of the murder and suicide of jovan bellcher. let's watch what he said tonight. >> i believe that there should be more effective controls on the sale of guns. >> roughly 40% of the guns purchased in this country do not require a background check for purchasing. i don't see in anyone should be able to purchase military style or bod
the wealthiest men in america, merchants, among them, john hancock, yes, thee bold john hancock on the declaration of independence whose name is synonymous with signature. long before that, he was arguably the wealthiest merchant banker in america living on beacon hill with a commanding view of the massachusetts landscape and sea scape. far from espousing individual liberty, hancock and his fellow merchants in new england, governed their businesses and communities with economic ruthlessness that often left their competitors homeless and penniless. like today's tea party movement, the colonial tea party had almost nothing to do with tea. tea was nothing more than a social beverage for wealthy women. men seldom draping it, and it ranked below ail and rum among beverages americans consumed most. the tea party movement that sparked the american revolution actually began 20 years earlier in the 1750s and 1760s when new england business leaders like today's tea party supported a costly government war, but refused to pay higher taxes to cover the cost of that war. the war had started i
.com/booktv. >> for the next 45 minutes, larry schweikart presents a history of america's global participation and influence from 1898-1945. he also posits that during this time the united states introduced numerous political, cultural, and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our lewis lemon auditorium. we, of course, welcome those who joins honor heritage.org website on all of these. would ask everyone here in house if you'd be so kind to check cell phones one last time and see that they are turned off. thank you, louis. amazing how many speakers actually start doing that. we will post the program on a website within 24 hours for your future reference, and, of course, our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, doctor larry schweikart is a native arizonan turkey on this bachelor and masters degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from university of california, santa barbara. throughout his high school an
>>> tonight, the top five things that america is talking about. number one, peace love and mutual understanding. yeah, right. not in washington. >> i won't play that game. >> we can't negotiate with ourselves. >> it is me. >> number three, bob costas. did he cross the line? number five, the most outrageous royal prank ever. >> hello there. could i please speak to kate please, my granddaughter? >> this is piers morgan tonight. good evening. our big story tonight from what every one is talking about. washington's high-stakes game of "let's make a deal," to the royal prank called heard around the world. to bob costas talking about guns. and this shocking new york subway photograph. reports of chemical weapons in syria. let's get started with what promises to be a lively discussion. abbe huntsman, and a host of huff posts live. and welcome to you all. let's start with guns and the fallout of the murder and suicide of jovan bellcher and his girlfriend. bob costas of nbc spoke out about this. let's watch what he said tonight. >> i believe that there should be more comprehensive and effe
in 2002, the kid, and basically we believe that america has a responsibility to be involved in the world in protection of our values and our strategic interests, all of which helps us be safer and freer here at home and it's just grown. >> senator graham, what is the secret to proper bipartisanship, do you think? >> well, in fairness to our colleagues, pierce, there's a lot of real close friendships around this place. there's a lot of republicans and democrat who get along very well and work together. the reason you're talking about the three of us, i think, is because of 9/11. there had never been an attack on america, we would have been three friends who travel and socialize, but what brought us together and put us on the map, after we were attacked on 9/11, everything in our country changed and throughout the world. as a result of 9/11 and all the national security issues that followed, our friendship became a cause. it really did solidify over the iraq war. bipartisanship as hyped is being willing to lose your job. i really admire john because he suffered for our country. and i hang
in asia and africa and the americas or do you basically surrender to decline? and i think that requires very tough choices about the time and energy and education systems and welfare systems and being not prepared to tolerate poor performance. >> rose: and rick stengel, managing editor of "time" magazine talking about "time" magazine's person of the year. >> i always like to feel the person who wins person of the year it's both backward looking in terms of the year past and forward looking in terms of what that person will do in the next year and beyond and obama is a perfect example of that. the next america is the america of today. which is why in effect he's person of the year. because he's the architect of this new america and i actually think it's a great thing because it's a more tolerant america, a more diverse america. >> rose: osborne and stengel. next. caioning spoored by roseommunications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george osborne is here. he is britain's chancellor of the exchequer. he has been called the austerity chancellor. he continu
america is the america of today. which is why in effect he's person of the year. because he's the architect of this new america and i actually think it's a great thing because it's a more tolerant america, a more diverse america. >> rose: osborne and stengel. next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george osborne is here. he is britain's chancellor of the exchequer. he has been called the austerity chancellor. he continues to lead the increasingly controversial austerity process. in a piece called "god sieve the british economy" in the upcoming "new york times" magazine adam davidson writes "in the past two years the united states has experienced a steep downturn followed by steady though horrendously slow upturn. the british economy, however, is profoundly stuck. the u.k. has been put on negative watch on three largest credit rating agencies. the european union is britain's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a
" for a second. still coming up, does the man behind gangham -- gan g nan style hate america? and why did a man call 911 after breaking into a home? and what happens if we send bill schulz out to an area to learn circus arts? hopeful leahy will learn -- hopefully he will learn something about himself? no, hopefully he will be pull vaw rised and viewed to pieces by a wild pack of dogs. greg? >> thanks. >> are you waring pajama bottoms with that outfit? >> i am not. >> decide to help somebody move and then get a head start? >> what an odd comment from somebody who is wearing basically the same thing. >> no. i have a tie on. you are looking like you would stay at home and watch "love actually." >> i will say goodbye with my giant mug. >> please do. >> let's welcome our guest. she is so sharp she can cut diamonds with her tongue. i am here with ann coulter. her latest book is called "mugged" my favorite way to enjoy herbal tea, a great brooke. and she is so british she kneeses double decker buses. it is imogen lloyd webber. three names because she is british and that's what they do. the latest book
. what is the most constructive, definitive thing that america's lawmakers can now do? >> you know, there is no single, simple solution. it has to be a multifaceted approach beginning with a ban on assault weapons, stopping high capacity magazines, better background checks. right now 40% of all sales of guns in the united states involve no background check and better, more come premen hen sif checks as well as mental health prevention and outreach programs and, of course, better enforcement of all of these laws. not just existing laws but more supporting resources for the atf and local and state police that have the responsibility to protect our children. >> i have been stunned by the sheer political cowardness of so many politicians in america who seem just terrified of saying anything that the nra may object to. the nra has four million members. american has 10 billion people living here. i just don't understand why everybody is so coward about publicly debating this and trying to get the measures in place that you've just suggested. >> i think there really has been a seismic cha
to everyone down there in times square, all across america. did you say it was an experiment with the dogs right there? >> all i can think of is my dog behind the wheel, what a mistake. >> that isn't happening with my dog. >>> and a look at lara. she is live in london this morning. >>> we also have the latest on the prank call to the hospital ward. >>> we also have the latest on the showdown in d.c. on our taxes and that fast-approaching fiscal cliff. president obama has rejected the latest republican offer. he's taking a very hard line in the talks. >>> there's growing outage here in new york city over a front-page photo from "the new york post" yesterday. this man has just fallen down on the tracks. is just seconds away from a subway train hitting and killing him. many people upset why the photographer was taking the picture and not helping the man. this morning, he's talking out, justifying why he took the photo. and why so many other folks were running away. there's nobody there trying to help him off the tracks. >> he says he was trying to help. we're going to get into that. >>> also,
. the nominations are closed. the balloting will proceed for the vice-president of the united states of america. will the vice presidential please ask the amount. electors, please mark your ballot in writing for vice president, and please do not forget to sign your ballot. will the vice presidential teller please collect the ballots from the electors hammon? >> the electoral votes of north carolina have been passed on this, the 17th day of december, 2012, through the republican electors, and the result is as follows. votes cast in the name of paul ryan. >> thank you. with secretary marshall please bring forth the certificates to vote. each elector or will have to sign six copies. i believe we are going to sign one copy, and if at the end the electors will remain seated, we will sign the other five copies. >> the electors having signed a certificate of the vote, at this point i would like to thank the staff of the state capital, the secretary of state's office, and the north carolina republican's staff as well as the north carolina republican party as well as the voters of north carolina for hel
condition, and his unspeakable violence. what will it take? what can we do? america's search for answers, a national conversation, starts right now on "gma." >>> and everything here is still so raw. here this morning. the community coming together. putting together those living ment memorials together. a town in tears but also a town galvanized by their grief. good morning, america, from sandy hook. i'm joined by josh and amy and lara. liz intet in new york. right now, all across america, parents are sending their children to school, a lot of fear as well. we want to begin with gun violence, mental illness. we'll continue it all week long. >> are my children safe, it's a question parents are asking. security has been beefed up at schools and campuses around the country. as new details now surface about the horrifying moments when the shooter entered that school and unimaginable. to end that, we'll be joined by the school nurse. >> sally cox. she'll be with us in a minute. >>> let's get right to the presidents right now. he spoke last night. he came here and met with the families. he was
. there is no debt crisis in the united states of america and europe, and there is no such thing as the debt crisis in my own country, which is nevertheless being consumed by debt. you know the joke about balloonist. the balloon has been blown off isrse, and at some point they no such thing as a debt crisis. manage to gain control of the balloon and lower it above a farm. the farmer comes out and looks up at the balloon and one of the balloonists says, excuse me, sir, where are we? and the farmer says, you are in a balloon. the balloonist says, he must be an economist. precisely accurate, and hopelessly useless. [laughter] we have a doctor here amongst us. imagine if you had a terrible case of a cancer patient in acute pain, and your diagnosis was, the person is experiencing a pain crisis. it wouldn't be useful. debt is a symptom of 2008, to be precise. it is what happens when a financial implosion begins on wall street, and then all sorts of dark forces break out, break loose, and they start dismantling the economic and social fabric of the world. these awful events happen once every hundred years
senator that's done more to help america's heroes adjust to life after the military. that's just one of the reasons why she will be sorely missed. here's another reason, though: kay has fought time and time again to promote tax relief for hardworking texas families. in thehooin the mid-1990's, shed create the so-called homemaker ira to make sure that stay-at-home moms and dads were able to save for their retirement on an equal basis with their counterparts who worked outside the home. i now it is one of her proudest achievements and i'm proud to join with the senator from merrell, senator barbara mikulski, in attempting to rename this ira the kay bailey hutchison spousal ira in her honor, and i hope, mr. president, we can join together and honor senator hutchison by getting that done before we close out our business this year. kay, of course, has always championed the state sales tax deduction, which may not seem like a big deal to others in this carriage carriages but it . but it is a big deal in texas. we don't have a state income tax. but we do pay a state sales tax. and of course
disgraceful. george will is one of the most recognizable people in america today. certainly, the most widely known intellectual. he is the author of the least a dozen books. since the early days of the show, he has been a regular on what is now "this week with george stephanopoulos." he is an astute philosopher. he is a native of illinois, a student of baseball, a lifelong cubs fan, and as such, he is a man of sorrows and acquainted with grief. [laughter] [applause] despite their rudeness of the invitation, he is my friend. george well. -- will. [applause] >> jack's invitation is perfectly acceptable. my dear friend william f. buckley once called up his friend charleton heston, the actor, and said chuck, do you believe in free speech? he said, of course. he said good, you are about to give one. it is a delight to be back here. it is a delight to be back on campus. long ago and far away, i was a college professor. in 1976, two of my friends ran for the senate against each other in new york state. the night they were both nominated, jim buckley got up and said, i look forward to running agains
to issue when he moved with the slaves to latin america. arrived with the knowledge that issue was feared by the christian missionaries. the slaves adopted issue as their patron deity, just to scare the christians who wanted them to convert. issue became the paramount symbol of resistance in latin america and the americas. in fact, it went beyond that. in some parts of brazil, for instance, you find that issue has even been elevated to the supreme deity simply because that was a symbol that was there, the protagonist for freedom. as they find the transposition of deities across the atlantic, not minor, became not only the symbol of resistance in the new world, but the supreme deity in certain parts of brazil. like brazilla, for instance. if you go to the heartland of the europa in brazil, and it's quite plain. but in certain parts issue became the supreme deity. now, consider today -- this was the history of the missionaries in africa, and it goes back a couple of centuries. now, imagine that kadi -- to be a faller of the religion, is virtually to earn the death sentence in certain parts
that america needs to go back to work. it's just a matter of having the will to do it, the programs are out there. compromise can be made around the streamlining of regulations to make sure that we are putting people back to work. if chris christy and barack obama can get -- chris cristie and barack obama can get together on that, and i know what's transpired and how the impact of our infrastructure has taken place along the eastern seaboard, it's something we ought to be able to rally around immediately. and of course everyone, everyone deserves a $250,000 tax break. we all agree on that. so why not just simply adopt it and then come back and we'll have time to address the issues as it relates to bending the cost curve on health care and focusing on the vast inefficiencies, the fraud, the abuse and the waste that totals more than $750 billion annually? as for the chairman from my district said, list, it would be a way for us to bring down the deficit but also make health care affordable, accessible and functional for the american people. something i believe we must do. with that let me int
jenna: thanks for joining us, everybody. jon: "america live" starts right now. megyn: fox news alert, the state department moments ago issuing new warnings to the syrian regime as we get reports that that country may be mixing chemical weapons that could be loaded into artillery shells or land-based missiles like these. they would then be fired directly at the syrian people. welcome to "america live," everyone, i'm megyn kelly. western countries, including the united states, are growing increasingly concerned after reports that bashar al assad's forces are actually mixing the chemicals that produce sterin, a manmade nerve agent that can cause convulsions and death and is believed to be one of the agents saddam hussein used back in 1988. most of the images from that attack are so horrifying, we cannot show them to you on television. but this picture shows one victim from that attack, a little boy lying in a hospital bed days after the massacre on his town that left thousands of people dead and many more injured. these are the stakes we're looking at in syria just moments ago the
minute secret deals to delight everyone on your list. >>> and a good monday morning to you, america. which is also to say, a happy and merry christmas eve. george and robin both celebrating the holiday with their families. glad to have amy robach, paula faris here. >> thank you, everyone. we have so many stories to tell you this morning. including the surprising story of this woman. she's accused of being, we're not making this up, too sexy for her job. her boss said she was too distracting and was actually threatening his marriage. she's the one who lost her job, not him. >>> we have great news to share with everybody. the best news of all. sam champion, everybody, getting married over the weekend. >> thank you. >> to rubem robierb, now rubem robierb-champion. it was the most beautiful ceremony. and robin looks fantastic. >> how does your hand feel? heavier today in. >> it feels odd. you have to get used to it, right? it takes how long? >> 15 years. give or take a few. >> seriously, congratulations. >> congratulations, we love you, and we love rubem. >> it was a wonderful night. a
recounts the life of america's sixth president on quincy adams who died in 1848. quincy adams was some of the second president john adams had a long political career which included, aside from his presidency, ten years of secretary of state, senator, congressmen and miniature. this is a little under an hour. i will start with a very simple question. was there a moment you said to yourself i need to write a biography of john quincy adams? >> yes, indeed, there was. a couple years ago when i ran out of any ideas on the founding fathers. others had written on washington, jefferson, madison, and i'd written on patrick henry, james monroe, james hancock. so i pulled out john f. kennedy's cal woods prize-winning book profiles in courage and their in chapter 1 was john quincy adams. i thought his name begins with a xu chapter 1. that's not the reason he was in chapter 1. john kennedy himself a war hero had listed these characters in order of the degree of courage, and he placed john quincy adams first among the most courageous senators and congressmen in american history. he was not just the
, the slogan better read than dead. but, we strongly rejected the idea that america represented the losing side in the struggle against soviet expansionism and the communist play that went with it. to the anti-communist passion we shared with chambers, inseparable from a commensurately powerful love for and faith in the united states of america and the civilization for which it had gone to war against the two great carriers of modern totalitarianism, first not see germany and now communist russia. and on like chambers, we believe that the united states would eventually turn back the communist threat to western civilization, just as surely as it had done to the equally evil threat posed by not to germany. not, mind you, that we underestimated the might of the soviet military or the strength and the resolve of the anti anti-communist forces. against as both at home and abroad. in fact, there were times when we came close to a feeling that chambers and other conservative anti-communist like james vernon who wrote a book entitled suicide of the last, we feared that they might be right. for me, one
was then the most prosperous town in america. it seemed they embodied american values. they were rich, upstanding citizens her father supported abraham lincoln. they were spiritual and were quakers within new england values of thrift to the point* of stinginess with her father and simplicity and plain living. to the quakers wealth was a sign of virtue and god's blessing so they were very blessed but her father really wanted a son. the first child was a girl. it was hetty. he became enraged and was furious. so much that her mother took to her bet. before she was two years old she was sent to live with her grandfather and her spinster aunt. she really wanted her father's love and do the only way to gain it was to earn it. because her father was an obsessed with money and he said so himself. her grandfather taught her to read the newspapers and the stock and bond places when she was a little girl. at the age of eight she opened her own account at a savings bank in town then sent off to the quaker boarding school taught about thrift, eat whatever is put before you, even if much and then if she did no
candidate for america. >> what if mitt romney isn't the best person? >> the idea that somehow making a business profitable is different than helping people. >> it's ridiculous for people to purchase a gun. >> did you get up this morning and have a quick -- >> i probably did, i probably did. >> "piers morgan tonight: the newsmakers" starts now. >>> good evening. one of the great things about my job is that every night i get to sit down with movers and shakers, the men and women at the center of the biggest stories of the year. what do they have in common? they're all utterly fascinating. tonight you'll hear from some of my favorite guests. we'll begin with the big man himself, governor chris christie. he found himself in a bit of hot water for making nice with president obama in the wake of hurricane sandy. >> 2.8 million people without power. i've watched these extraordinary scenes over new jersey today, really quite unprecedented. i've never seen anything quite like it. have you ever seen anything like this in your lifetime? >> no, i haven't. you know, you see sights like the seasi
gabbers. >> brian: he is one of america's favorite coach. his career almost ended early and fans had no idea. the coach revealed something for the very first time. by the way. "fox and friends" starts now. ♪ ♪ "fox and friends". >> steve: you must be conflicted today. >> brian: in what way? >> steve: we have coach k on and any time we have peitro, the super model who has been a friend of your manies, many years. >> brian: i am looking forward to nick rangon. >> gretchen: you will have to duke me out for it then. >> brian: you start with him in 10 minutes. >> gretchen: you want to trade coach for nick it will coach you. >> brian: and edrolins to be named later. >> gretchen: and i always like rolins. >> brian: pet up with us. she was a young super model. >> gretchen: does she know she was off your list. >> brian: not a world. can we agree as well that is our secret. >> steve: she doesn't have to know. we have a busy three hours starting with a fox news alert. >> gretchen: we have one out of carey. president mursi returning, mohammed that is returning to the palace. he took off amid
meaning for one of america's greatest artists. in a letter to his brother, winslow homer said of his surroundings, "there is certainly some strange power "that has an overlook on me, directing my life. "that i am in the right place, there is no doubt. "i have found something interesting to work at and time to do it." for almost three decades, winslow homer made his home on prouts neck, a rocky point just south of portland, maine. his house still stands on the high ground overlooking the sea. visiting the place where homer lived and worked is john wilmerding, deputy director of the national gallery of art. homer's studio was a remodeled stable set about 200 yards from a large summerhouse thatis older brother bought in 1883. although homer was close to his family, he enjoyed the solitude his studio provided, but most of all, it was the ocean outside which reall made this place so important to him. the love of nature was very much a part of homer's time. his family joined the growing number of americans in the late 19th century who could afford to escape the city heat and spend summers
their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. [ male announcer ] a european-inspired suspension, but it's not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. ♪ it's a car like no other... from a place like nother. introducing the all-w 2013hevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp out. you know we've been open all night. is this a trick to get my spot? [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at fedex office. to come home for the holidays. that's double miles you can actually use... sadly, their brother's white christmas just got "blacked out." [ brother ] but it's the family party! really jingles your bells, doesn't it? my gift to you! the capital one venture card! for any flight, any time! tha
on "good morning america." >>> meanwhile, lot of news developing overnight. for that, we turn to john muller. who's in for ron claiborne. >>> good morning, everyone. for the second time in as many weeks the nfl is mourning the loss of one of its players. the dallas cowboys josh brent will be in court this morning. he flipped his car early saturday morning that killed a teammate. we're hearing from brent for the first time this morning. abc's clayton sandell has the story. >> reporter: police say that dallas cowboys player josh brent was speeding down this road, just after 2:00 a.m., when his mercedes crashed, flipped and caught fire. in the passenger seat, his teammate, jerry brown. >> when our officers arrived on scene, mr. brent was removing -- or dragging mr. brown from the vehicle. >> brent was given and failed field sobriety tests. brown was rushed to a hospital where he died. >> once the officers learned that brown had passed away then mr. price-brent was under arrest for intoxication manslaughter. >> on behalf of josh, a tremendous loss to him. this was like losing a little bro
was bombed by boko-haram. >> thank you very much. i work for the voice of america. you know much about pakistan. in comparison to the last 15 years, how much the relationship between the pakistani-based military organization, especially those in power, they are in bed with al qaeda or others? one of the pakistani federal ministers said the islamic -- they have relations with the extremist organization there. he has provided whatever evidence he has. there was also talk from the pakistani officials [inaudible] in your comparison, do you see the relationship being broken? >> that is a big question. i will try to be very brief. the connections between various to extremist groups in pakistan and al qaeda remained deep. as i suggested, i think mumbai plot, if carefully studied, underscores those connections. i think we have seen it in other instances. people tend to give away their real feelings in moments of grief. for the jihad to groups in pakistan, the death of been great.xpressed his it is hard to say they don't have a connection in moments of the eulogy when they are terribly sorry to
the minute money department of corrections, mass murder in america was most severe in 1929. in recent years, there were 32 mass killings in the 1980s, 42 in 9 '90s and 26s in the first decade of this century. according to the department of justice, murders of school age children have declined by 42% in the past 15 years. the latest stats show 1% of the murdered kids died at school. now, that's not to diminish the horrible crimes we have seen in connecticut and other places recently. all americans should understand that violence like that harms america's image throughout the world and we do have a gun culture here. no question about it. if the feds can tighten up gun laws without violating constitutional rights, they should do so. is it legal is one glaring question. how could the mother of the killer have acquired an ar 15 when connecticut has tough gun law? to build a build country, a safer country, we don't need knee jerk reactions after heinous crimes. we need smart solutions. listen to this exchange at the white house yesterday. >> you name one thing the president has done in the last f
, and south america and the various countries were beginning to rebel against spanish king and the french team and they were going to send and put down rebellions in english would keep the french from growing to south america. they invited americans to join in keeping the french out of south america because south america was rich with all the gold and silver. john quincy adams was secretary of state and said absolutely not, were not going to get involved in foreign wars. we're not going to let them come over here either. the seeds were planted for the monroe doctrine. it was part of monroe's annual message and he announced his cabinet for help in putting together some sort of statement, making our international policy clear. john quincy adams wrote the corporate vision of god. there are three long paragraphs that now call the monroe doctrine. he tells the europeans he does not want to get involved in wars. we don't want anything to do. you stay out of our affairs. the band of the colonial era had come to an end. you can no longer consider americas as father for colonial aspirations and any att
, definitive thing that america's lawmakers can now do? or my -- my little boy is going to come back to me and i'm never going to have him again and -- but at least i can look at it that way and see the real meaning of christmas this year. >> neil, i'm at a bit of a loss of what to say to you. you've shown such extraordinary dignity and compassion in this interview and i've got three sons. i can't even imagine the hell of what you're going through and the way that you've spoken about it all shows such dignity on your part and i just want to thank you for that and to wish you all the very best as you try and rebuild your life from what's happened and jesse sounds like a remarkable young man. >> it's going to be a big change and a big adjustment next year. but i hope we can all focus on making it a positive one and making sandy hook a happy place like it was. the way i could describe that school, it was like mayberry, going there in the morning and dropping your children off and seeing the other parents. it was just happy. everybody was happy. the teachers, the staff, the children. and it's
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 273 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)